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Film of the day
  • SWEETGRASS

    Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Ilisa Barbash France, 2009

    This breathtaking view of the American West revealed the groundbreaking vision of Lucien Castaing-Taylor & Ilisa Barbash from Harvard’s Sensory Ethnography Lab (Leviathan) through its visual and aural pleasures. Newly restored, Sweetgrass is one of the defining documentaries of this century.

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  • HIDDEN

    Jafar Panahi France, 2020

    PRELUDES: OPÉRA DE
    PARIS SHORTS

    A little miracle of a short from Iranian master Jafar Panahi, this beautiful film finds echoes of his 2018 feature 3 Faces. A moving examination of performance and personal liberty in the face of religious oppression, Hidden is a tender and intimate mystery that builds to a piercing conclusion.

  • PLAY IT SAFE

    Mitch Kalisa United Kingdom, 2021

    A MUBI Release
    BRIEF ENCOUNTERS

    Winner of a Grand Jury Prize at SXSW, Play It Safe is an ingeniously tense interrogation of unconscious racism in seemingly liberal spaces. Shot on 16mm, the film’s audacious finale stamps a visceral exclamation point on a remarkable calling card for director Mitch Kalisa and actor Jonathan Ajayi.

  • BUNGALOW

    Ulrich Köhler Germany, 2002

    VANISHING ACTS: AN
    ULRICH KÖHLER DOUBLE BILL

    A young man goes AWOL in Bungalow, a film uniquely attuned to a slow-burning despair barely contained by its outwardly ordinary appearance. The hugely impressive first feature from Köhler—indicative of the low-key yet deeply existential filmmaking would become characteristic of the Berlin School.

  • IN MY ROOM

    Ulrich Köhler Germany, 2018

    Recalibrating the end of the world as an apocalypse of identity, In My Room is a profound spin on “Robinson Crusoe” from Berlin School director Ulrich Köhler. With welcome appearances from both Pet Shops Boys and Clint Eastwood, this wry gem is an ingenious portrait of a bourgeois life in ruins.

  • PVT CHAT

    Ben Hozie United States, 2020

    Exclusive
    MUBI SPOTLIGHT

    A satirical tale of obsession in the digital age, PVT Chat stars the electrifying Julia Fox—recently discovered in Uncut Gems—as an online dominatrix. Set in the cool but alienating world of New York’s art scene, this noirish sex comedy interrogates the uneasy boundaries between fantasy and reality.

  • POTICHE

    François Ozon France, 2010

    PERFORMERS WE LOVE

    François Ozon dives into delightful satire with this pastiche of 70s bourgeois chauvinism which evolves into a burlesque comedy of female empowerment! With Catherine Deneuve and Gérard Depardieu playing attracted opposites, Potiche indulges in a hilarious camp portrait of class conflict mayhem.

  • PANIC

    Sándor Reisenbüchler Hungary, 1978

    FABLES, FOLKLORE,
    FUTURISM: VISIONARY HUNGARIAN ANIMATIONS

    An idiosyncratic critique of consumerism, this frenetic animated collage transports the familiar trope of monster mayhem to a prismatic alien civilization plastered with magazine cut-outs. Often shown during Star Wars screenings, this awe-striking short became widely beloved and popular in Hungary!

  • ENDLESS NIGHT

    Eloy Enciso Spain, 2019

    A MUBI Release
    THE NEW AUTEURS

    Cinema often turns to the past for answers about the present, but no other film has captured Spain’s postwar malaise like Eloy Enciso’s stunning nocturne. Poignant memoirs, Bressonian acting, and jaw-dropping chiaroscuros make this study in fascism an entrancing journey into the depths of the night.

  • LUCKY CHAN-SIL

    Kim Cho-hee South Korea, 2019

    A wonderful, loosely autobiographical debut from Hong Sang-soo’s former producer Kim Cho-hee, Lucky Chan-sil observes its titular protagonist’s listlessness with unwavering empathy, charm, and droll film industry humor. Extra support comes from none other than Minari Oscar-winner Youn Yuh-jung!

  • While not your typical anthology film, Cosmos does feature six stories from as many directors, woven together into an interconnecting whole. The most artful segment comes from an up-and-coming Denis Villeneuve, 25 years before he ventured into a less metaphorical cosmos with his adaptation of Dune.

  • SÉRAPHINE

    Martin Provost France, 2008

    PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST

    In a time when artist biopics have become homogenized, Séraphine is a heart-warming portrait of an artist and her unlikely scale to fame. Showing rather than telling, this venturous drama stands as a sincere ode to the fragile, yet transformative power of self-expression.

  • FEAR X

    Nicolas Winding Refn Denmark, 2003

    Nicolas Winding Refn’s American debut struggled to find its audience on release. Ripe for reappraisal, it lands somewhere between the nightmarish visions of David Lynch and the metaphysical mysteries of Memento. With an against-type lead in John Turturro, Fear X is rich with atmospheric foreboding.

  • TWO GODS

    Zeshawn Ali United States, 2020

    Announcing the arrival of a major new voice in nonfiction filmmaking, Zeshawn Ali’s debut is a vibrant portrait of community and faith. Beautifully composed in black and white, Two Gods renders its subjects with great intimacy to create an invaluable document of the Muslim American experience.

  • I LIKE LIFE A LOT

    Kati Macskássy Hungary, 1977

    Life in rural Hungary turns vivid in this unusual animated short made from children’s drawings. Despite their young age, the budding artists impressively capture the hardships faced by the Romani community with equal stoicism and innocence, all while adding a dose of fantasy to everyday routines.

  • CORPORATE ACCOUNTABILITY

    Jonathan Perel Argentina, 2020

    A MUBI Release
    UNDISCOVERED

    In some brave films, pointing a camera amounts to an accusation. Jonathan Perel’s extraordinary documentary does exactly this. With the sinister atmosphere of clandestine detective work, this investigative film reveals the dark crimes of Argentina’s living history hiding behind present-day facades.

  • IN SEARCH OF FAMINE

    Mrinal Sen India, 1980

    For arguably one of his best films, Mrinal Sen masterfully turns the film-within-a-film trope on its head to comment on the film industry’s apathy and blind privilege. Featuring an outstanding performance by Smita Patil, this nuanced critique of exploitative art practices remains extremely relevant.

  • MOVING ON

    Yoon Dan-bi South Korea, 2019

    The superb debut feature from Yoon Dan-bi, a rising star of South Korean cinema, this nostalgic family drama evokes the tender sensitivity of the Oscar-winning Minari and the delicate compassion of Hirokazu Koreeda. Impeccably crafted and intimately observed, Moving On will instantly win your heart.

  • BLUEBEARD

    Claude Chabrol France, 1963

    A NEW WAVE OF SUSPENSE:
    A CLAUDE CHABROL DOUBLE BILL

    Scripted by Françoise Sagan, Claude Chabrol’s true crime take on one of the most notorious French serial killers is simultaneously chilling and farcical. The mockery of bourgeois respectability is made even more delicious by opulent sets and the casting of glamorous stars such as Danielle Darrieux.

  • THE THIRD LOVER

    Claude Chabrol France, 1962

    Claude Chabrol’s overlooked early film exemplifies the director’s soon-to-be signature disdain for bourgeois values. Ruthlessly toying with marital sanctity, this cruel examination of the basest human instincts also hints at the instability of the French national identity in the aftermath of WWII.

  • VITALINA VARELA

    Pedro Costa Portugal, 2019

    Luminary Pedro Costa’s unique, collaborative style of portraiture reaches a magnificent peak in Vitalina Varela. Amongst haunting chiaroscuro compositions, Varela’s real-life stories of love, migration, and deceit take the form of bewitching incantations—and earned her Locarno’s Best Actress award!

  • THE WALL

    Julian Pölsler Austria, 2012

    Shot on location in the Austrian Alps, this stunning adaptation of Marlen Haushofer’s influential 1962 novel features a tour de force performance from Martina Gedeck. Incorporating the source text through voiceover, Julian Pölsler’s film poses provocative questions about what it means to be human.

  • HEY, YOU!

    Péter Szoboszlay Hungary, 1976

    Brilliantly simple, it takes nothing more than four walls for Péter Szoboszlay to engulf us in a state of mind-bending paranoia. At heart a critique of the psychological consequences of living under authoritarianism, Hey, You!’s inventive visuals and potent metaphors make it a true masterpiece.

  • YOUR DAY IS MY NIGHT

    Lynne Sachs United States, 2013

    Exclusive

    In this intimate hybrid documentary, Lynne Sachs crafts an invaluable portrait of the lives of Chinese immigrants in America. Empowering its participants to play themselves through monologues, theatrical performances, and conversations, the film is an imaginative work of collective history.

  • CHANGE OF LIFE

    Paulo Rocha Portugal, 1966

    Deeply embedded in the fog-hewn landscapes of its coastal fishing village, this second feature from Portuguese modernist Paulo Rocha was restored under the supervision of Pedro Costa. A mournful, delicately rendered tale of wounded love, Change of Life is a masterpiece of bruised, melancholy beauty.

  • THE GREEN YEARS

    Paulo Rocha Portugal, 1963

    Paulo Rocha’s The Green Years is one of the great Portuguese debuts. Now magnificently restored, this breathtakingly modern, Lisbon-set tale of urban acceleration and romantic turmoil takes the stylistic freshness of the contemporaneous French New Wave and cloaks it with an anguished melancholia.

  • STYX

    Wolfgang Fischer Germany, 2018

    Shot largely on the open sea, Wolfgang Fischer’s visceral Styx is equal parts moral drama and white-knuckle thriller. A perfect parable for our present times, the film thoughtfully grapples with difficult questions regarding personal responsibility and the grim treatment of refugees by the West.

  • ALLÉLUIA

    Fabrice Du Welz Belgium, 2014

    Dusting off the gnarly exploitation classic The Honeymoon Killers for the age of New French Extremity, Belgian iconoclast Fabrice du Welz writes a squalid valentine to the psychotic-lovers-at-large genre. Nightmarishly textured, and woozily hypnotic, Alléluia is a menacing and moody thrill-ride.

  • SWIMMING OUT TILL THE SEA TURNS BLUE

    Jia Zhangke China, 2020

    One of the defining voices of the international arthouse, Jia Zhangke has become the foremost chronicler of China’s rapid transformation through his form-bending cinema. This beautifully shot documentary uses the art of oral history to turn personal memory and literature into the story of a nation.

  • PAJU

    Park Chan-ok South Korea, 2009

    Devastating and beautiful, Park Chan-ok’s sophomore feature blurs temporal signposts and reimagines storytelling conventions. Against a backdrop of urban gentrification, ruminations on irredeemable mistakes and repressed memories turn tactile, mirrored in the recurring image of demolished homes.